Breakfast for Lunch

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Try as I might, I am not a morning person. I am known to abuse the alarm, both verbally and physically. My brain doesn't quite work so making a decision such as which fiber-loaded rational cereal should I have for breakfast is on par with should I choose the blue pill or the red one? For the first few minutes of being awake, the coffeemaker is my only friend in the world.

Still, I am a fan of large breakfasts. Starch. Protein. More starch. Cups of coffee. Hard to achieve when you've got a late start and loads of work to do. Even harder when you've procrastinated in your workout clothes, determined (half-assed) to do the next series of weight training and plyometrics.

Solution: Breakfast for lunch.

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Here's the set up: have a few potatoes, a few strips of bacon and some eggs always on hand. It's part of my larder at home. And I've shelved away the same at Andy's place. He, too, enjoys breakfast meals taken at different hours of the day.

If you're like me, you do everything in one pan. Fry up the bacon. Reserve the cooked strips and keep the grease in the pan for some diced potatoes. If you've got garlic or onion to contribute, go for it. The smaller the dice, the less it'll take to cook. Plus more surface area for golden crunchiness. If you're like Andy, the bacon stays in one pan, the potatoes in another. Either way, when the potatoes are just about done, you'll scoot them over to one side and crack in some eggs, a la short order diner cook.

The rest is up to you -- how crispy or chewy you like the bacon. How you cook the eggs. Have toast handy. Butter and jam optional. I use mine for some yolk diving. The home fries are good, too.

A lunch like this will last well into dinnertime, preventing the dreaded case of the late afternoon snack-attack.

Home Fries

These aren't hash brown, which I consider to be the shredded potatoes fried on a flat greased surface. These guys are home fries, cubed and fried, producing a crunchy exterior and a fluffy tender interior. Of course, the better your knife skills, the smaller you can get them and the faster they'll cook. But other than the bit of manual labor, it's actually quite easy to prepare.

For 2 folks ... 1 large russet potato OR 2 to 3 Yukon Golds, diced (peeling is optional) * at least 2 tablespoons preferred fat like olive oil and butter OR bacon brease OR duck fat * 1 garlic clove, smashed and peeled * salt and pepper to taste

Heat the fat in a large skillet over medium high heat. Throw in one cube. If it sizzles, throw in the rest. If it doesn't, wait a bit before tipping the whole lots of diced spuds in. Add garlic if using. Fry, stirring occasionally, until the cubes are golden and potatoes are tender. Season with salt. Andy likes some manner of chili pepper. I wait for the hot sauce. I like some tang with the heat.

Serve with eggs. More bacon than you think you need. And yes, LOTS of coffee.